Exercise, Not Puzzles, May Protect Aging Brain

If you want to protect your brain against the effects of aging, a brisk daily walk may do more for you than brain teaser puzzles or social activities, a new study finds.

Researchers with the University of Edinburgh in Scotland, studying nearly 700 people in their early 70s, found that those who were most physically active had less brain shrinkage than those who got less exercise. At the same time, social and intellectually challenging activities, like going to the museum, learning a new language or visiting friends, seemed to have no protective effect on brain changes.

“Those who took more exercise had less brain atrophy, less damage to the wiring of the brain, and greater volumes of grey matter, which are the ‘thinking’ cells. We did not find any associations between being more socially or intellectually engaged and brain health,” says study author Alan Gow, a senior research fellow at the University of Edinburgh.

The research, published in the journal Neurology, is part of a long-term study on aging that involves a group of participants born in 1936. Those involved in this study were given brain MRI scans at age 73. They also filled out questionnaires about their physical activity, ranking it on a six-point scale from ” moving only in connection with necessary (household) chores” to “keep fit/heavy exercise or competitive sport several times per week” and rated how often they participated in 15 different leisure activities.

While researchers wrote that exercise seemed to protect against brain shrinkage, they added that it’s still unclear exactly how. Is exercise really protective, or is that those experiencing cognitive decline are less likely to exercise? While Gow stops short of recommending exactly how much exercise is best for brain health, Paul Thompson, professor of neurology at UCLA’s School of Medicine, says any exercise increases the oxygen level of blood, and that may keep brain tissues healthier. “It’s not necessary to run or even lift weights. Walking is just as effective. The bulk of the evidence is really just calories burned.”

But don’t throw out those brainteaser puzzles yet, says Thompson. They may still have a positive effect on the brain — just one that couldn’t be measured by the type of scans the Scottish researchers used.

Here’s How to Prepare for a Nuclear Attack

Here’s How to Prepare for a Nuclear Attack

by Daisy Luther

The nuclear standoff between the United States and North Korea has intensified to a level that can lead nowhere good. It’s time to talk about how to prepare for a nuclear attack.

First, here’s some of the recent chatter.

Last weekend, incendiary words between the two countries leave little doubt in anyone’s mind that a nuclear attack is likely to happen. The international smack-talk is leading somewhere.

Many people strongly believe that this is a media creation and that North Korea isn’t actually a threat. Even if that is the case, it wouldn’t be hard to imagine that an attack could happen on US soil, regardless of the perpetrator. Although we must always watch the news with a healthy dose of skepticism, this isn’t the purpose of the article. Survival is.

Here’s a quick summary of what has been going on over the past week, according to the global media:

Aug. 3: After a successful ICBM (Intercontinental Ballistic Missile) test, North Korea threatened to send “unexpected ‘gift packages” and said that America is “on the knife’s edge of life and death.” At this point, experts established that an ICBM bearing a nuclear warhead could reach New York City within an hour.

Aug. 5: The UN imposed economic sanctions on North Korea that could cost the country up to one billion dollars.

Aug. 6: President Trump threatened North Korea. He told reporters, “North Korea best not make any more threats to the United States. They will be met with fire and fury like the world has never seen.”

Referring to North Korea’s volatile leader, Kim Jong-un, Mr. Trump said, “He has been very threatening beyond a normal state, and as I said, they will be met with fire and fury, and frankly power the likes of which this world has never seen before.”

Aug. 8: North Korea’s state-run news agency, KCNA, said their military was “examining the operational plan” to strike the US territory of Guam with strategic ballistic missiles. CNN reported, “Specifically, the statement mentioned a potential strike on Andersen Air Force Base designed ‘to send a serious warning signal to the US.’”

Aug. 9: North Korea dismissed Trump’s threat and called it a “load of nonsense,” stating that only “absolute force can work on the president.

Whether this is propaganda or not, we should be on high alert. A very real threat has been established; let’s move on to actions that we can all take in order to make ourselves safer.

First things first, it’s essential to keep abreast of the news. Sign up here for my daily newsletter – I’ll let you know what I know, the moment I know it.

Would a nuclear attack kill us all or cause a global nuclear winter?

I got a message from a reader the other day that encompasses what a lot of us are thinking:

Korea now has a Nuke or Nuke capabilities. Do you beef up your preps, wait for the chips to fall, kiss your butt goodbye, or other? Should we be acting business as usual?
First, let me dispel two myths about a nuclear attack.

We won’t all die or wish we were dead if a nuclear strike occurs. The movies – as much as I love them – have done us a terrible disservice here. If you are at Ground Zero of an attack, there is absolutely nothing you can do. Everything will be vaporized and that’s that. However, if you are outside the immediate blast zone, it is completely survivable and I don’t mean survivable in the horrible, lingering death kind of way. I mean, unharmed. You just have to know exactly what to do immediately in order to protect yourself. More on that in a moment.

We won’t suffer a nuclear winter. Everything thinks it will be like the post-apocalyptic scenario in that horrible book/movie, The Road. People aren’t going to be trying to eat each other. In that particular plot, the nuclear war was so great that a huge cloud of ash covered the planet. In reality, it would take hundreds of nuclear strikes to cause something like that, which is unlikely to occur. This isn’t to downplay the horror and death of one strike, but to point out that the aftermath isn’t going to make the quality of life on Earth as terrible as what the movies portray.

Here is what would happen if a 10-kiloton nuclear strike occurred.

Contrary to popular belief, a nuke won’t kill everyone within hundreds of miles. If you aren’t in the immediate blast radius, a nuclear strike is absolutely survivable.

The one-mile radius around the blast will be virtually unsurvivable. Within two miles, people will suffer 3rd-degree burns from the intense wave of heat.

If you are within two miles of the blast, the winds will be coming at about 600 miles per hour. This will take down buildings and cause a tremendous amount of pressure. Some experts recommend that you keep your mouth open to try and reduce the pressure on your eardrums. Looking at the blast could cause permanent blindness.

According to the DHS, 10 kilotons is the approximate size of nuclear weapon we could expect.

Nearly everyone within a half-mile radius of the point of impact would die and most of the buildings would be demolished. This would be considered Ground Zero.
The area within the next half-mile would suffer extensive damage, fires, and serious injuries.
Areas within three miles could see minor injuries to people and slight damage to their homes.
The fallout would kill even more people. According to the DHS:
Within 10 to 20 miles of the explosion, radioactive exposure would cause nausea and vomiting within hours and death without medical treatment.
But for those near enough to the blast, experiencing more than 800R of radiation, not seeking shelter immediately would cause deaths with or without medical treatment, the study found.
People would notbe able to evacuate this area, as fallout would arrive within just 10 minutes.
People upwind of the strike and outside the 20-mile radius would be unlikely to suffer any effects. People downwind would need to take shelter. Deaths from cancer that is related to the fallout could occur for many years after.

Here’s what I’m doing to prepare for a nuclear attack.

As cool as it would be to have one, you don’t have to have a bunker to survive if you take the time now to get prepped. You can survive by learning everything you can to prepare for a nuclear attack.

So, here’s what I’m doing.

Every time a new threat rolls around, I discover that while I have many of my bases covered, there are a few things I hadn’t accounted for. A nuclear threat is no different. There were some supplies I had to pick up myself, particularly a bigger supply of no-cook food.

Part of your preparations will depend on where you live, so this will be different for everyone. Are you near any places that are likely targets? Places like Washington DC, Hawaii, New York City, Los Angeles, and large military bases are more likely targets than say, a low population area in the Midwest. Of course, this doesn’t mean it can’t happen. Just that it’s less likely.

Are you in a house or an apartment building? What is the best place in your home to seek shelter? Plan all of this ahead of time. If you know exactly what steps you are going to take, you will be able to better perform them under pressure.

Here are some key points to consider.

You won’t have a whole lot of notice.

Scientists say that residents of Hawaii would have only 8-12 minutes notice if an ICBM was headed their way, and residents of New York City will have an hour. Clearly, there won’t be time to run to the store – and if you did, you’d be fighting it out with a bunch of terrified, panicked people – so get your supplies together now.

You could be in your car.

If you are in your car, make certain to turn the vent to recirculation so that you don’t bring any outside air into the vehicle. Your goal should be to immediately get to shelter.

Be prepared to go into lockdown.

In nearly every case, staying home is the best course of action. Imagine you are in New York City and this nuke is headed your way. If you try to evacuate, you are most likely to get stuck on one of the bridges on the way out of Manhattan and that would be far more deadly than hunkering down in your apartment and hoping you are outside the half mile radius of Ground Zero. Experts say that you should plan to stay sheltered for a minimum of 9 days. Our personal plan is 14-21 days, depending on proximity and wind direction. I’d rather err on the side of caution, personally.

During a talk on surviving a nuclear attack, professor Iwrin Redlener, US specialist on disaster preparedness, said: “In that 10 to 15 minutes, all you have to do is go about a mile away from the blast.

“Within 20 minutes, it comes straight down. Within 24 hours, lethal radiation is going out with prevailing winds.”

Prof Redlener said you should feel for the wind and begin running perpendicular to it – not upwind or downwind

He said: “You’ve got to get out of there. If you don’t get out of there, you’re going to be exposed to lethal radiation in very short order.

“If you can’t get out of there, we want you to go into a shelter and stay there. Now, in a shelter in an urban area means you have to be either in a basement as deep as possible, or you have to be on a floor – on a high floor – if it’s a ground burst explosion, which it would be, higher than the ninth floor.

So you have to be tenth floor or higher, or in the basement. But basically, you’ve got to get out of town as quickly as possible. And if you do that, you actually can survive a nuclear blast.”

The most hazardous fallout particles are readily visible as fine sand-sized grains so you must keep away from them and not go outside if you see them.

While I’m not a professor, I would not be trying to run perpendicular. I’d be trying to get inside to shelter, ASAP.

Fortify your home against fallout.

Use duct tape and tarps to seal off all windows, doors, and vents. Get a LOT of duct tape and tarps.
Turn off any type of climate control that pulls the outside air into your home. Expect to survive without heat or air conditioning for the duration.
Close off your chimney.
If someone enters the home, make certain that there is a room set up that is separate from other family members so that they can decontaminate. All clothing they were wearing should be placed outside and they should immediately shower thoroughly.
Make a breezeway for putting things outdoors (like pet or human waste.) Hang heavy tarps around the door and put on disposable coveralls, gloves, shoe covers, and masks if you have to actually go out. Disrobe, discard the disposable clothing by tossing it out the door, and shower immediately when you get back inside.
If you don’t have a basement, go to the most central part of your house and erect as many barriers as possible. If there is no central area without windows and exterior walls, go to the room furthest away from prevailing winds.
Have enough supplies on hand to wait out the danger.

As with many emergencies, you need to be prepared to survive at home without help from anyone. It’s unknown whether water and electricity will be running, and if the water is running, whether it will be safe to drink. Prep as though you won’t have access to these utilities and if you do, then it’ll be a pleasant surprise.

Stock up on emergency food. (Get Non-GMO Emergency Food in bulk HERE)In our current home, all of my emergency cooking methods rely on me being able to go outdoors. Because of this, I have stocked a one month supply of no-cook foods that do not require refrigeration. Canned vegetables and fruits, canned beans, pouches of rice and quinoa, crackers, peanut butter, dried fruit. You get the idea. The eating may not be exciting, but we won’t starve to death. You can find a more thorough list of no-cook foods here.
Have a supply of water for all family members and pets that will last throughout the 9-day waiting period that you need to remain indoors. (Or longer, which is what we’re planning.)
Get paper plates and cutlery in the event that the water isn’t running so you don’t have to waste your precious supply washing dishes.
Don’t forget a supply of pet food.
Make certain you have a potassium iodide supplement on hand to protect your thyroid gland. (Here’s how to use it.) And here’s another source for it – supplies are going fast.
Be prepared for the potential of a power outage.
If you have pets, have supplies on hand for their sanitation – you can’t let them go outside because not only would they be exposed, they would bring radiation in with them. So, pee pads, cat litter, etc, are all necessary. Solid waste can probably be flushed.
Have the supplies to create an emergency toilet. (This one is cheap and simple.)
Make sure to have a supply of any necessary prescription medications that will last through the time that you hunker down.
Have a well-stocked first aid kit. It’s entirely likely that medical assistance will not be available, and if it is, you’ll put yourself at risk by going out to seek it.
Have a way to get the news from the outside world. An emergency radio is a must.
Learn everything you can.

This is an overview but there is much more to learn about a nuclear event and the more knowledge you have, the more likely you are to survive without any ill effects.

Lisa Bedford and I created a course over at Preppers University called The Nuclear Preparedness Intensive. It contains 2 hours of interviews with a military nuclear expert, hundreds of pages of downloadable information, shopping lists, military guides, and far more information than I could ever put together in a blog post. With this course, you will truly know everything that I know about surviving a nuclear attack. It costs $29. You can learn more about it here. We had been working on this for quite a while, but with the uptick in rhetoric, we decided now was the time to introduce the class. It will really help you be prepared.

For some free additions to your nuclear library, you can print out this manual from the US government about surviving a nuclear emergency. It was written with first responders in mind, but much of the information would be applicable for us, too. The book, Nuclear War Survival Skills, by Cresson Kearney, is also available for free online.

The more you know, the better your chances are of unscathed survival.

You CAN survive if you prepare for a nuclear attack.

The only part of your survival that is in the hands of fate is whether or not you are at Ground Zero. The rest is up to you. You can’t expect the government to save you. You can only save yourself.

Get prepared. Today. Because we just don’t know what’s about to happen.

I am a Seenager

Seenager

I just discovered my age group!

I am a Seenager. (Senior teenager)

I have everything that I wanted as a teenager, only 50-60 years later.

I don’t have to go to school or work

I get an allowance every month.

I have my own pad.

I don’t have a curfew.

I have a driver’s license and my own car.

I have ID that gets me into bars and the wine store. I like the wine store best.

The people I hang around with are not scared of getting pregnant, they aren’t scared of anything, they have been blessed to live this long, why be scared?

And I don’t have acne.

Life is Good! Also, you will feel much more intelligent after reading this, if you are a Seenager.

Brains of older people are slow because they know so much.

People do not decline mentally with age, it just takes them longer to recall facts because they have more information in their brains.

Scientists believe this also makes you hard of hearing as it puts pressure on your inner ear.

Also, older people often go to another room to get something and when they get there, they stand there wondering what they came for.

It is NOT a memory problem, it is nature’s way of making older people do more exercise.

SO THERE!!

I have more friends I should send this to, but right now I can’t remember their names!

Make Your Holidy Safe & Enjoyable…Tips to Protecting Your Identy

Among the hustle and bustle leading up to the holidays, it’s easy to get caught up in the shopping frenzy. The feeling is all too familiar—where the main concerns become making it to the right shops in time, getting our hands on the right gifts, and making it out before we’ve spent too much money. As you hop from store to store, you’re probably watching your accounts to make sure your purchases are still within budget. But there’s more to keep an eye on … like protecting your personal & business identity.

In 2015 alone the Federal Trade Commission received more than 3 million reports from victims of identity theft.

Many experts suggest that there is a rise in identity theft around the holidays because there are more opportunities for thefts to occur unnoticed. Pickpockets and other identity criminals are out in full force during the holidays and they are everywhere. While staying a few steps ahead of them is critical, having the right plan of attack is equally important in the event something slips through the cracks.

Chances are, you’ve probably been advised to destroy old paper documents that contain sensitive information, and to do so in a secure environment. The truth is, we live in a digital age, and by shredding documents containing personal information, you’re really just scratching the surface.

Make your holiday season safe and enjoyable by following these helpful tips wherever you are:

Out in public

Crowded malls and sidewalks provide ample opportunities for thieves to nab your wallet and bank cards, not to mention other personal information. While you’re out and about, remember:

  • Carry a wallet equipped with RFID (Radio Frequency Identification) blocking capability. RFID technology allows credit cards to be read without having to swipe them through a machine. Having an RFID blocking wallet will help prevent thieves from picking up your credit card info through your jacket or purse.
  • Protect your belongings. With all of the distractions in a busy store, it’s easy to forget to secure your wallet. Pickpockets thrive in a crowd, so limit the amount of personal data you carry with you. This includes not carrying around your Social Security number and checkbook.
  • When in doubt, make purchases via credit rather than debit. The bottom line is, if a fraudulent charge is made, getting your money back is a less arduous process with credit than with debit.
  • Avoid non-bank-affiliated ATMs. You never know who’s really handling your moneyor your bank information when you use an ATM, unless it operates under a legitimate bank. Always look for familiar banking institution emblems.
  • Keep an eye on those around you, especially at places like the ATM machine and checkout line. You never know who could be standing behind you in line watching you key in your PIN number.
  • Make sure you get all your cards back after making a purchase and watch that your credit card is swiped only once. Don’t forget to keep all of your receipts in a safe place.

Cell Phone Security

When you want to compare prices or check your bank accounts on the go, it’s nice to know that because of today’s smartphones, you have the world at your fingertips. Remember, just because you’re the only one that uses your smartphone, doesn’t mean it’s not susceptible to prying eyes. Sticking to a few rules of thumb will help keep your personal information personal:

  • Avoid using public Wi-Fi connections. Hackers can use public networks to get full access to unsecured devices on the same network, like your smartphone. Not only that, they use an unsecured network to distribute malware.
  • Close phone apps after you’re done using them. Even though you don’t see them up on your screen, doesn’t mean they’re not still running—and if they’re still running, hackers still have access to data stored within them. Another option is to just remove sensitive apps like those you use for banking altogether during the holiday season.
  • Delete your browsing and cookie history to avoid password or PIN capture. The last thing you want is for a crook to have the keys to your castles.

Online

Shopping online from the comfort of home or from a cozy coffee shop has become a favorite way to shop. And why not, when you can avoid the long lines and traffic altogether? Shopping this way can be extremely convenient, but you should remain cautious. The internet can be an open range for savvy identity thieves to prey on vulnerable customers, especially when credit information and other sensitive data are constantly being sent electronically. Here are some tips to keep in mind before browsing the web for holiday deals:

  • Shop only from companies you know and trust. Period.
  • Ensure the websites you are on are secure and legitimate. Phishing scams are one way identity thieves can try to steal your personal information online. Making sure that a website is encrypted over a secure connection is easy. When its URL begins with https (as opposed to just http), your network is secure. Also, look for a “Lock” icon displayed in the address bar before or after the URL. You can see more detailed info by clicking it.
  • Update all your anti-virus and anti-spyware programs and, again, avoid doing your online shopping at wireless hotspots where your network might not be secure.

At Home

You can be susceptible to identity theft even in the privacy of your home. An identity crook needs little more than your Social Security number, bank information, or a pre-approved credit application to steal your identity. Here are a few ways to safeguard your personal information while at home:

Mail—Your inbound and outbound mail has more personal information than you may realize. To protect yourself, always be sure to:

  • Remove your mail from your mailbox daily. If you are going to be away for a period of time, have the post office hold your mail or have a trusted friend or neighbor pick it up. If possible, you should also consider having a lock on your mailbox.
  • Shred all unwanted documents. Bank statements, credit card bills, and insurance policy renewal notices can get lost between all of the other mail you get during the holidays. Dumpster diving is a common way identity thieves can get access to these documents, so simply throwing them in the trash is not enough. If it identifies you and you don’t need it—shred it.
  • Take all checks and mail with account information directly to the post office, or a secure mailbox to prevent a thief from taking it from your mailbox.

Phone calls—The holidays are a common time for charities to ask for donations over the phone.  But not all calls are from legitimate sources. An identity thief could pretend to be soliciting a donation for a charity, or act as a representative from your credit card company. Never give out your financial information over the phone when someone calls you. If you’d like to make a donation, contact the organization yourself to ensure your gift is getting to those it was intended for.

Wishing you a very Merry Christmas & a Happy New Year!

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The power of giving

The power of giving anyway you can.

There are many ways one can give; money is one way but there are many other ways to give and help others. Below is one of those ways; Enjoy!

XANGO Goodness Foundation

Uploaded on Nov 5, 2009

Giving is a core element of XANGO’s mission, and the company has supported worthy causes that benefit children and families worldwide since its inception. As XANGO grows, so does its ability to affect more lives, While the XANGO Goodness movement has benefited many thousands worldwide as a branded charitable initiative for XANGO, the time has come to extend XANGO’s reach. XANGO has now registered the XanGo Goodness Foundation, a public 501 (c)(3) charity. The Foundation is part of XANGO, LLC’s ongoing commitment to mobilize its global resources to better the lives of others through philanthropic action.

This move strengthens XANGO’s fundraising abilities and commitment to transparency, and expands XANGO’s ability to help even more people in need.

XANGO Meal Pack

Uploaded on May 8, 2009

XANGO Goodness gives back.

More on XANGO and XANGO Meal Pack at http://wanda500k.iamxango.com/xango-goodness-foundation

XANGO Goodness

Published on Oct 24, 2012

A look inside XANGO Goodness, accompanied by our very own Chairman & CEO, Aaron Garrity, singing “You Are Beautiful” (the Linda Perry classic made famous by Christina Aguilera).

XANGO started giving back before we even opened our doors. Focusing on children in need, we now lead the industry in social responsibility, setting a new standard for corporate caring. It’s built right into our company’s DNA—our Distributors give generously to organizations like Operation Smile, Americares and Best Buddies just by building a business (and often choose to give much more). We’re proud of what we’ve done together, and we hope you enjoy these smiles as much as we do.

 

XANGO Meal Pack story to share

GOODNESS

Giving is a core element of XANGO’s mission. It’s an essential part of how we do business, something we’ve embraced from our very earliest days. The XANGO Goodness Foundation supports charitable missions, humanitarian relief and feeding programs around the globe.

XANGO’s involvement—with support from the company, distributors and employees—creates positive change in the lives of children worldwide, and it increases opportunities for better health, education and social acceptance.

Goodness Newsletter

 

Wanda K Robinson, Wanda Robinson

(a.k.a –  wandalkr, wanda500k, mkwandarobinson)

Naples, Idaho

wanda@icanget2.net

Live Your Life, Live Your Dream, Live Your Way

FREE GIFT AS A THANK YOU FOR READING MY POST BELOW CLICK OR TAP TO MAKE YOUR VERY OWN QR CODES

 

A Test For Those Of Us Over 50

About Me

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DON’T LOOK BELOW FOR THE ANSWERS UNTIL YOU HAVE TRIED TO FIGURE IT OUT.   

1. After the Lone Ranger saved the day and rode off into the sunset, the grateful citizens would ask, “Who was that masked man?” Invariably, someone would answer, I don’t know, but he left this behind. What did he leave behind? ________________.  

2. When the Beatles first came to the U.S. In early 1964, we all watched them on The ____ ___________ Show.

 

3. ‘Get your kicks, __ _________ _______.’

 

4. The story you are about to see is true. The names have been changed to _____ _ _____.’

5. ‘In the jungle, the mighty jungle, ____ ____ ____ ____.’

 

6. After the Twist, The Mashed Potato, and the Watusi, we ‘danced’ under a stick that was lowered as low as we could go in a dance called the ‘_____.’

7. Nestlé’s makes the very best…. _________.’

8. Satchmo was America ‘s ‘Ambassador of Goodwill.’ Our parents shared this great jazz trumpet player with us. His name was ______ ___________.

 

9. What takes a licking and keeps on ticking? _______.

  

10. Red Skeleton’s hobo character was named ______ ___ ________ and Red always ended his television show by saying, ‘Good Night, and ‘________ ________’

 

11. Some Americans who protested the Vietnam War did so by burning their ______ _______.

 

12. The cute little car with the engine in the back and the trunk in the front was called the VW. What other names did it go by? ___ & _______.

  

13. In 1971, singer Don MacLean sang a song about, ‘the day the music died.’ This was a tribute to _______ ____________.

 

14. We can remember the first satellite placed into orbit. The Russians did it. It was called __________.

15. One of the big fads of the late 50’s and 60’s was a large plastic ring that we twirled around our waist. It was called the ______ _____.

16. Remember LS/MFT _____ _____/_____ _____ _____?

 

17. Hey Kids! What time is it? It’s _____ ______ _____!

 

18. Who knows what secrets lie in the hearts of men? Only The _____ Knows!

 

19. There was a song that came out in the 60’s that was “a grave yard smash”. Its name was the ______ ______!

 

20. Alka Seltzer used a “boy with a tablet on his head” as its Logo/Representative. What was the boy’s name? ________     

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ANSWERS: 1.The Lone Ranger left behind a silver bullet. 2. The Ed Sullivan Show 3. On Route 66 4.To protect the innocent. 5.The Lion Sleeps Tonight  6. The limbo  7. Chocolate  8. Louis Armstrong  9. The Timex watch  10. Freddy, The Freeloader and ‘Good Night and God Bless.’ 11. Draft cards (Bras were also burned. Not flags, as some have guessed)  12. Beetle or Bug  13. Buddy Holly  14. Sputnik  15. Hoola-hoop  16. Lucky Strike/Means Fine Tobacco  17. Howdy Doody Time  18. Shadow  19. Monster Mash  20. Speedy

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